Drunken Pirate Cake

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This is a cake that I made at the spur of the moment. I saw the bananas starting to go brown and nobody was eating them. I thought it would be nice to make a sweet-ish bread and a sweeter sauce that could be added for a pirate effect. I literally threw these ingredients together with the hope of producing a dense cake that would soak up a rum sauce nicely. This is a homage to my dear friend Katt – and the rest of the pirates who soaked bread in rum so it would store for those long trips out at sea. Here is what I used:

  • 1 cup almond meal
  • 1 cup wheat flour
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup dark rum of choice
  • 2 bananas
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 1 egg beaten
  • 1/2 cup almond milk

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blend and puree two bananas, rum, almond milk, vanilla together. Pour into dry mixture of flour, meal, sugar, nuts, salt, baking soda. Add one egg and mix well with a wooden or large spoon. Add almond milk to liquify mixture if needed. Pour into 9″ pan (buttered). Sprinkle nuts and add some slices of butter to the top. Bake at 350 for 35-40 min.

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Combine a shot of rum, one cup of water, one cup of brown sugar, 1/4 cup honey, tablespoon of vanilla and a cinnamon stick. Sauce simmers for about an hour. Chill the sauce and drizzle on cake and sliced banana.

These birds have been eating the cat food! These fly away with one morsel at a time.

These birds have been eating the cat food! They fly away with one morsel at a time.

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2 thoughts on “Drunken Pirate Cake

  1. From Pusser’s Folklore: (http://www.pussers.com/t-folklore.aspx)

    “At sea, rum was a kind of currency, just like money. To offer a shipmate a portion of one’s tot, no matter how small, was deemed to be the apotheosis of generosity. The men purchased articles from one another using rum as the currency; they played cards and other games of chance for it, and it was used to repay favors. Rum had a value, and like money, it came in different denominations defined by how much one might take or be given from another’s tot. A wet was just enough on the lips to cover them thoroughly with rum. A sipper, a gentlemanly sip when offered; a gulper, one, but only one, big swallow (usually given as a favor), and Sandy Bottoms … a rare privilege (in some cases, a settlement of a debt) involving drinking the entire contents of another’s tot. The currency of the tot went like this:

    3 ‘wets’ (a tiny, tiny sip) equalled 1 sip.
    3 sips equalled one gulp.
    3 gulps equalled one tot.”

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