Persian influenced yuca anyone?

I must say Katt’s dehydrating adventures are inspiring me to cook up something both unconventional and portable for brunch, a celebration of the kind of food you can eat while walking, or multi-tasking (which I do a lot of).

I am also excited about my new cook book by Lilia Zaouali entitled: “Medieval Cuisines of the Islamic World” which is filled with amazing artwork and recipes that the ancient Arabs tediously recorded by hand, creating a legacy unique to Persia. I find the dishes combine flavors that still hold up to today‚Äôs palate, but for some reason are less commonplace. Some of these flavors include cinnamon, dates and rosewater (my favorite, used as a reduction or as a part of gravy, yum! I’ll have to revisit that.)

A couple of these flavors have worked their way into what I now call Sweet Yuca Patties, an experiment that stemmed from my desire to discover ways to cook yuca root ( or manioc), which I recently picked up from a local market. It is somewhat similar to potato and in traditional South American cuisine is sometimes complimented by sweet citrus flavors.

Typically I make a potato/onion/cheese patty that is savory and dips into sour cream or applesauce. For this dish, I created a sweeter (not too sweet) version of my brunch fav by combining about 1 1/2 cups of finely shredded yuca (which I peeled the bark from first), a scoop of my favorite fig and ginger jam, lime zest, sea salt and a light dash of cinnamon. I browned the patties in extra virgin olive oil and served them up with a dollop of sour cream and spoonful of fig jam.


Artwork and images by Lori Esposito

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